demented clockwork hummingbird

dayriderbusking:

boxlunches:

This one post reminded me of how when I was a kid, when I was playing Mario Kart 64 alone, I’d select Princess Peach and I’d do different tracks in a certain order, all while pretending that Peach was escaping on her own from Bowser’s Castle.

I’d do the Bowser’s Castle track to “break out,” then I’d go to Banshee Boardwalk because such a spooky place surely would be right outside Bowser’s place, then I’d go through Rainbow Road to get back to “earth,” and from there I’d go through the desert and the valley and the ice and the jungle and all of that until finally I was on the track around Peach’s castle, because that meant I “made it home.”

Ha, I don’t know why I wanted to mention it. Just another example that when little girls play pretend, they make their female characters a lot more proactive than we realize even when the media tells them not to (which is very damaging and horrid). But before little girls are aware of that stuff, I think their default setting is to be proactive, and if they’re surrounded by good media, that can be nurtured and encouraged. Even when we were playing house and school and tea parties, we were still always in charge. Doesn’t matter if you’re the princess who bakes cakes or rescues herself so much as if you’re in charge of your own destiny. I don’t know. <3

I guess what’s most interesting about this scenario is that I was only about eight to ten years old, I wasn’t doing it out of spite or any conscious reason to do with female empowerment. It was just an adventure that made me feel good. I was Peach and it was cool to bust myself out even when I had no real problem with her needing to be rescued on other occasions. But so long as I was Princess Peach, I wanted to take the wheel.

image

a) awesome message is awesome!
b) that is just a ridiculously good idea, I’d love to see that become its own game, her escaping, getting back to the Mushroom Kingdom and the game ends with her just going ‘why do I keep you guys around again?’

tsunderelintz:

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.
But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.
What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.
Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

also, stonehenge is fucking boring as shit, and i’ve been to it 3 times at least.

tsunderelintz:

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.

But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.

What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?

But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.

Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

also, stonehenge is fucking boring as shit, and i’ve been to it 3 times at least.

copperbadge:

thehappysorceress:

johnthemurray:

Agent Carter as captain America (x)

Looking good, Peggy.

THE WING HAIR CLIPS THO

copperbadge:

thehappysorceress:

johnthemurray:

Agent Carter as captain America (x)

Looking good, Peggy.

THE WING HAIR CLIPS THO

daniskatra:

the answer of someone who has thought about it at length

owlmylove:

badsketchies:

A comic of my current favorite tumblr post in existence.

oH MY GOD. YOU DREW STEVE IRWIN’S VICTORIAN ANCESTOR. PLEASE WAIT WHILE I GOOGLE WHICH STATES I CAN LEGALLY MARRY DRAWINGS IN THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN

owlmylove:

badsketchies:

A comic of my current favorite tumblr post in existence.

oH MY GOD. YOU DREW STEVE IRWIN’S VICTORIAN ANCESTOR. PLEASE WAIT WHILE I GOOGLE WHICH STATES I CAN LEGALLY MARRY DRAWINGS IN THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN

"I love you." ✓Seen at 3:23
Six Word Story by Pien Pouwels
(via ramengirl48)